Definition

Rational Unified Process (RUP)

Rational Unified Process (RUP) is an object-oriented and Web-enabled program development methodology. According to Rational (developers of Rational Rose and the Unified Modeling Language), RUP is like an online mentor that provides guidelines, templates, and examples for all aspects and stages of program development. RUP and similar products -- such as Object-Oriented Software Process (OOSP), and the OPEN Process -- are comprehensive software engineering tools that combine the procedural aspects of development (such as defined stages, techniques, and practices) with other components of development (such as documents, models, manuals, code, and so on) within a unifying framework.

RUP establishes four phases of development, each of which is organized into a number of separate iterations that must satisfy defined criteria before the next phase is undertaken: in the inception phase, developers define the scope of the project and its business case; in the elaboration phase, developers analyze the project's needs in greater detail and define its architectural foundation; in the construction phase, developers create the application design and source code; and in the transition phase, developers deliver the system to users. RUP provides a prototype at the completion of each iteration. The product also includes process support for Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) and BEA (WebLogic) development, and supplies an HTML-based description of the unified process that an organization can customize for its own use.

Getting started with use Rational Unified Process
To explore how Rational Unified Process is used in the enterprise, here are some additional resources for learning about RUP:
Rational Unified Process learning resources: According to Rational (developers of Rational Rose and the Unified Modeling Language), RUP is like an online mentor that provides guidelines, templates, and examples for all aspects and stages of program development.
Book excerpt: Implementing the IBM Rational Unified Process and Solutions (A Guide to Improving Your Software Development Capability and Maturity) This chapter focuses on key points to bring awareness and generate excitement about RUP. It outlines the ROI you might expect from implementing RUP and IBM Rational Solutions, common problems that these methods may solve and how to sell the executives on this process solution and tools.

Contributor(s): heba
This was last updated in February 2007
Posted by: Margaret Rouse

Email Alerts

Register now to receive SearchSoftwareQuality.com-related news, tips and more, delivered to your inbox.
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy

More News and Tutorials

  • Scaling Agile software development: Challenges and solutions

    Software consultant Nari Kannan describes how agile practices and work can be scaled appropriately for success in large organizations. Using lean thinking, reduction of waste, and appropriately organizing work and people, agile can be successfully adapted, regardless of the size of the organization.

  • Rise in hidden software glitches caused by programmer retirements

    Undiscovered software glitches in complex systems are common, and one of the primary drivers is the loss of mainframe knowledge of a retiring workforce. Software glitches are lurking in many large systems, particularly mainframe systems, and the COBOL programmers that understand the code best are retiring, according to Jeff Papows, author of the new book, "Glitch - The hidden impact of faulty software." Papows describes how faulty software caused a huge charge to debit card holder's account and why such mistakes are on the rise in this interview. Papows notes the three most pressing drivers for software glitches: loss of intellectual knowledge, market consolidation and the ubiquity of technology

  • Professional development for software testers

    Karen Johnson suggests a variety of ways that testers can gain additional skills and experience, including social networking and open source testing.

Do you have something to add to this definition? Let us know.

Send your comments to techterms@whatis.com

There are Comments. Add yours.

 
TIP: Want to include a code block in your comment? Use <pre> or <code> tags around the desired text. Ex: <code>insert code</code>

REGISTER or login:

Forgot Password?
By submitting you agree to receive email from TechTarget and its partners. If you reside outside of the United States, you consent to having your personal data transferred to and processed in the United States. Privacy
Sort by: OldestNewest

Forgot Password?

No problem! Submit your e-mail address below. We'll send you an email containing your password.

Your password has been sent to: