ALM Definitions

  • A

    application lifecycle management (ALM)

    Application lifecycle management (ALM) is the supervision of a software application from its initial planning through retirement. It also refers to how changes to an application are documented and tracked.

  • C

    cache thrash

    Cache thrash is caused by an ongoing computer activity that fails to progress due to excessive use of resources or conflicts in the caching system.

  • collaboration diagram

    A collaboration diagram, also known as a communication diagram, is an illustration of the relationships and interactions among software objects in the Unified Modeling Language (UML).

  • continuous software development

    Continuous software development is a blanket term that covers several aspects of an iterative application development process based on making each change when it is ready, rather than wrapping many changes into large batches.

  • cruft

    Cruft is the elements of a program, system or product that are either useless, poorly designed or both. In computing, cruft describes areas of redundant, improper or simply badly written code, as well as old or inferior hardware and electronics. Cruft may also be used to describe a group of hackers, like a pod of whales, exultation of larks or murder of crows. (Continued...)

  • D

    domain model

    In agile software development, a domain model describes the application domain responsible for creating a shared language between business and IT. (Continued...)

  • I

    IC-BPMS (integration-centric business process management suite)

    Integration-centric business process management suite (IC-BPMS) combines business process management (BPM) and service-oriented architecture (SOA)... (Continued)

  • J

    Jira

    Jira is an application lifecycle management (ALM) tool from Atlassian that provides different packages to suit various customer needs.

  • L

    language-oriented programming (LOP)

    Language-oriented programming (LOP) is an approach to software development that focuses on the use of domain specific languages (DSLs) to solve problems within various domains in a system or application.

  • M

    model-driven development (MDD)

    Model-driven development (MDD) is a format to write and implement software quickly, effectively and at minimum cost.

  • P

    PERT chart (Program Evaluation Review Technique)

    A PERT chart, sometimes called a PERT diagram, is a project management tool used to schedule, organize and coordinate tasks within a project.

  • R

    requirements analysis (requirements engineering)

    Requirements analysis, also called requirements engineering, is the process of determining user expectations for a new or modified product.

  • reuse-oriented model or reuse-oriented development (ROD)

    The reuse-oriented model, also called reuse-oriented development (ROD), is a method of software development in which a program is refined by producing a sequence of prototypes called models, each of which is automatically derived from the preceding one according to a sequence of defined rules... (Continued)

  • S

    software development life cycle (SDLC)

    The software development life cycle (SDLC) is a framework used in project management to describe the stages and tasks involved in each step of writing and deploying the instructions and data computers use to execute specific tasks.

  • Subversion

    Subversion is a version control system that keeps track of changes made to files and folders (directories), facilitating data recovery and providing a history of the changes that have been made over time... (Continued)

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